Tall tales at the Arabian Abbey!

The Abbey Theatre Youth Group will be performing Arabian Nights on 18th, 19th and 20th June. Back ' Cameron Adam, Erin Hudson, Demi Stephen, Hayley Morris, Cameron Couzins, Jamie Smith, Nathan Dear, Joseph Sheerin Humphrey, Eithan Plaxton, Maisie Paterson and Kian Telfor. Seated ' Emma Smith, Donald James, Georgia Ritchie, Kelsey McKenzie and Taylor Burnett.

The Abbey Theatre Youth Group will be performing Arabian Nights on 18th, 19th and 20th June. Back ' Cameron Adam, Erin Hudson, Demi Stephen, Hayley Morris, Cameron Couzins, Jamie Smith, Nathan Dear, Joseph Sheerin Humphrey, Eithan Plaxton, Maisie Paterson and Kian Telfor. Seated ' Emma Smith, Donald James, Georgia Ritchie, Kelsey McKenzie and Taylor Burnett.

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We always look forward to seeing what delights the Abbey Theatre Youth Group present and once again we were not disappointed.

Their production of ‘Arabian Nights’ adapted by Dominic Cooke, which has its last night tonight (Friday) was a well-constructed pastiche of comedy, serious social comment and above all, love.

There is always a danger of Mr Murphy getting involved in any theatrical production, and although there were one or two technical problems on the night the cast handled them all with aplomb.

To stop the murderously serial-marrying ways of the heartbroken King Shahrayar (Cameron Adam) Sharazad (Maisie Paterson), daughter of the Vizier (Jamie Smith) hatches a plan to marry him and with the help of her sister Dinarzad (Georgia Ritchie) capture his heart with a 1,000 spell-binding stories.

The core players were all excellent, and in fact each member of the young cast was on good form and we particularly liked the different and ingenious storytelling methods.

Well done to: Demi Stephen, Cameron Couzins, Taylor Burnett, Josef Sheerin Humphrey, Hayley morris, Nathan Dear, Erin Hudson, Donald Stewart Emma Smith, Kelsey McKenzie, Kian Telfor, Eithan Plaxton who covered a multitude of different roles, from entertainingly drunk beggars to vicious robbers, brave princes and cunning princesses.

Using cloaked children as a ‘living cave’ for ‘Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves’ was a great stroke, especially as a flip of the cloak turned them into sacks of gold.

The costumes were all excellent, from ‘The Talking Bird’ to the rather extravagant royal outfits and with the sumptuous King’s bedchamber really gave the production a taste of exotic Persia.

Directors Carol Bruce and Alan Johnston should be proud of their young charges for another great show.