Arbroath Authors under the spotlight

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Sugary treat of a book ‘We Need More Meringues’ about Goodfellow & Steven (Arbroath) Ltd. is released to the public on November 7.

Synonymous with the appealing scents of freshly baked goods, tales from inside the Arbroath High Street stalwart, Goodfellow & Steven can now be read in a new book to mark 60 years since it was acquired from Carnegie Soutar Ltd.

Written by Ronald Goodfellow, grandson of the founders, the recollections of the premises and the people have been greatly assisted by the then confectioner Ernie Gerrard who is best-known in brass band circles today.

It recounts details of the shop, restaurant and ballroom which many people still recall along with his personal memories of the town of Arbroath at that time.

The book will be released in the shop at 211 High Street, Arbroath on November 7.

Stocks of the book will also be held in their shops in Carnoustie, Monifieth and Broughty Ferry with the facility to copies ordered to any of the premises.

A ‘Toxic’ crime thriller set in Arbroath and Dundee follows the recklessly brilliant Detective Donna Davenport as she attempts to stop an illegal shipment of a deadly chemical, into the area.

Written by Arbroath writer Jackie McLean, Toxic was previously shortlisted for the Yeovil Literary Prize and longlisted for the Dundee International Book Prize.

The story draws on the horrors of the real life chemical disaster in Bhopal and a desperate search for the lethal toxin, from the perspective of Detective Davenport and her own tumultuous personal life.

McLean weaves the story around the competing pressures of political wrangling and the daily lives of the complex characters.

Jackie McLean has worked as a government economist and political lobbyist and instinctively incorporates the institutional dynamics of local government into Toxic.

Come along to Darling’s Coffee Shop, Arbroath High Street on November 7 at 6 p.m. for the book launch and reading from Jackie McLean.

Finally, from a week filled with Angus prose, is ‘Maelstrom: The George Beattie Conspiracy’ by Barry Dominic Graham and John Molloy which was launched at the Signal Tower Museum recently. The colourful biography of the early nineteenth-century Scottish poet, lawyer, philanthriopist and genius, George Beattie of St Cyrus hopes to set the record straight on years of what the authors believe, to be misinformation surrounding the poet. Visit www.thegeorgebeattieproject.co.uk to find out how to purchase a copy.