Taking care of the carers

Angus Carers Day held in the Carnoustie Golf Hotel on Wednesday. Pictured with some of the carers, three ladies at front - Candace Laing acting chairperson of the board, Alison Myles CEO and Katie Webster retiring CEO.
Angus Carers Day held in the Carnoustie Golf Hotel on Wednesday. Pictured with some of the carers, three ladies at front - Candace Laing acting chairperson of the board, Alison Myles CEO and Katie Webster retiring CEO.

Angus Carers Centre celebrated the contribution made by their 2,000 registered carers with a range of events to mark Carers Week.

They included information stands at health centres and community hospitals, and a Carers Day held at the Carnoustie Golf Hotel Wednesday.

Around 120 carers enjoyed a day of being looked after rather than doing the looking after. A wide range of light-hearted workshop was on offer, from glass painting to seated exercise, cup cake decorating to drumming and gardening to relaxation.

The events of Carers’ Week, which runs until Sunday, are planned to help people identify themselves as carers, provide relevant information and to also provide an opportunity to have a break from caring.

The theme of Carers’ Week is ‘Prepare to Care’. It focuses on how carers are coping and at how effective is the support they receive to assist them in their caring role.

Caring can impact hugely on peoples lives with three quarters of carers say their health is worse because of their caring responsibilities. It takes time, energy and can leave a person isolated.

Katy Webster, chief executive officer of Angus Carers Centre, explained: “Nobody plans to become a carer and it can often be difficult to recognise yourself as a carer. However, the impact of caring for a family member, young or old, who has long term illness or disability affects every area of your life from putting stress on family relationships and finances to impacting on career plans and leisure activities, dreams and hopes.

“It is important that such people know that there is a wide range of support available tailored to the needs of each carer. Often simply having the opportunity to meet with others in a caring situation can be very helpful.”