Hospitalfield looking to the future

Architects met at Hospitalfield to move the capital development stage 1 into the detailed design phase. Pictured are: Rod Heyes, Peter St John, Andrew Brown, Alan Harper Steve Wood and Steve Kenicer.
Architects met at Hospitalfield to move the capital development stage 1 into the detailed design phase. Pictured are: Rod Heyes, Peter St John, Andrew Brown, Alan Harper Steve Wood and Steve Kenicer.

The plans towards the development of Hospitalfield House in Arbroath have taken a step forward.

The governors of Hospitalfield met last week to announce the progression of the first stage of what is being labelled as the Future Plan.

The plan aims to develop the design and detail of the overall scheme dedicated to developing Hospitalfield House. The design team is being led by the architects Caruso St John who’s recent successes include The Tate Britain Millbank Project.

Simon Dessain, chairman of the Hospitalfield Trust, said: “These plans are all very exciting and we could not be more delighted to be working with Caruso St John but the focus for the Governors must now be the fund-raising target.

“This is an intelligent approach to renewing Hospitalfield; a project that will balance the renewal of some of the most fragile historic buildings on the site with the development of new facilities - this is a very special project for Arbroath, for Angus and indeed for Scotland.”

In the last year Hospitalfield has received a £500,000 grant from Historic Scotland and Creative Scotland has pledged a further £1 million which will go towards the £3.5 million needed in stage one of the project to renovate the old studio buildings, Victorian fernery and gardens and the development of new studio and residential quarters.

Director of Hospitalfield Lucy Byatt said: “Completing Stage One will make everything at Hospitalfield work better; we will be able to bring more visitors to Hospitalfield as well as generate income that will ensure a bright future for this wonderful place. Stage Two is a highly complex stage that will focus on the heritage; the house and the collection. This requires a great deal of research and development, some of which we are already tackling.”