Generous donation in memory of Barrie

A combined cheque totalling �1675.18 was presented in the Station Bar on Tuesday evening for CRY (Cardiac Risk for the Young). Condor Sergeants Mess gave �200, Station Bar �150 and donations at Barry Lee's funeral �1275.18. Holding the cheque are from left - Ian and Jessie Cadman, Stacey Walker Barrie's partner and Jack Lee Barrie's son with the others looking on.
A combined cheque totalling �1675.18 was presented in the Station Bar on Tuesday evening for CRY (Cardiac Risk for the Young). Condor Sergeants Mess gave �200, Station Bar �150 and donations at Barry Lee's funeral �1275.18. Holding the cheque are from left - Ian and Jessie Cadman, Stacey Walker Barrie's partner and Jack Lee Barrie's son with the others looking on.

OVER £1,500 has been donated to a national charity for sudden death syndrome in memory of a well known Arbroath man.

Barrie Lee (30) passed away suddenly while working in Ghana in June of last year.

An autopsy revealed that the former boxing champion had died of a heart attack in the West African nation while working as a field engineer manager for Weatherford International.

At Mr Lee’s funeral at St Andrew’s Church a collection was taken for Cardiac Risk for the Young (CRY) and St Andrew’s Church.

A total of £1,275.18 was realised for the charity and this was bolstered by donations of £200 from RM Condor’s Sergeants’ Mess and £150 from the Station Bar.

Mr Lee’s partner, Stacey, said: “My partner Barrie passed away back in June and at the funeral we had a collection for CRY, the sudden adult death charity and some also went to St Andrews Church.

“The reason we’ve done it for CRY is because Barry Lee was really fit and healthy and it came as a big shock to us.”

According to Stacey the family had a great deal of trouble discovering the truth about Barrie’s sudden death, but CRY provided invaluable support.

She explained: “We’ve still not had a post mortem result from Ghana. We’ve been having a lot of bother and with CRY’s help we’ve been able to get through a lot to get a second post mortem.

“Because it was in Ghana Scotland wasn’t having anything to do with it because they said it wasn’t in their jurisdiction.

“We weren’t willing to do a funeral without a post mortem but luckily we found a pathologist at Ninewells who would do it, but only for research purposes for Cry and that’s why we are giving the money to them.”

She added: “We’re doing this to let people know about Cry. I didn’t know just how many people are affected by sudden death but it is becoming more common.”