Footballers’ result for charity

Petra McMillan of Marie Curie Cancer Care was photographed with the Arbroath U-14 team before thier bag pack at Morrisons on Saturday morning. The proceeds will be split between the two organisation.
Petra McMillan of Marie Curie Cancer Care was photographed with the Arbroath U-14 team before thier bag pack at Morrisons on Saturday morning. The proceeds will be split between the two organisation.

More than 20 players from Arbroath Football Club’s junior teams bagged a winning result for their club and a leading charity on Saturday at a fund-raising event in Morrison’s supermarket.

Swapping their fancy footwork for a more dextrous activity, the young men from the under-16s and under-14s teams spent the full day packing shoppers’ bags to raise cash for their club and Marie Curie Cancer Care.

With monies split evenly between both partners, Marie Curie’s pot will be used to directly fund additional hours of free professional nursing care for the terminally ill at home in Arbroath and the surrounding area.

Petra McMillan, Marie Curie’s patron in Angus, who organised the event in conjunction with Mark Anderson, head of youth development at Arbroath FC, applauded the club’s enthusiasm to support the many local families who rely on Marie Curie in their hour of need by taking on such a community-minded challenge.

Petra said: “Marie Curie does a fantastic job supporting families in Arbroath but for every one patient we do help, one is turned away due to lack of funds.

“With the support of businesses such as Morrison’s and AFC we will be able to reach more families desperate for end-of-life support.

“At the same time, every donation today will help nurture and support the young men who represent our town at games across the country.

“We hope that shoppers appreciate our teamwork and what we’re trying to achieve for the local community.”

This year Marie Curie’s army of 2,000 nurses in the UK expect to care for 28,000 people with terminal illnesses in their own home and 7,800 in one of their nine hospices.

Faced with a terminal diagnosis, research shows that, given a choice, 63 per cent of people would want to die in comfort of their own homes, yet across the UK 55 per cent of people die in hospital - the place many of us say we’d least like to be.

Marie Curie cares for people with a range of terminal diagnoses, not just cancer. As many as 25 per cent of the charity’s patients have other illnesses such as dementia, heart failure and chronic obstructive airway disease.

By 2014 Marie Curie aims to double nursing provision in an effort to meet the increasing demand on it’s services.