Babies ‘off to the best start’

As part of breast feeding awareness week a buggy push was organised for new mums as a bit of fun for the week's events. They walked from Arbroath information centre to the local infirmary.
As part of breast feeding awareness week a buggy push was organised for new mums as a bit of fun for the week's events. They walked from Arbroath information centre to the local infirmary.

Arbroath mums-to-be discovered the benefits of breastfeeding at an event to mark the start of Breastfeeding Awareness Week.

At Asda last Monday, Aimee Thain, student health visitor, and Karrie Campbell, breastfeeding support worker, from Angus Community Health Partnership, hosted an information stand during the morning.

The aim of Breastfeeding Awareness Week was to highlight the many benefits of breastfeeding to new mums and to encourage more mums to breastfeed.

Both Aimee and Karrie were on hand during the morning to chat with mums and give support and advice on breastfeeding.

Visitors to the stand were also able to pick up ‘Off to the best start’ information leaflets which offer practical advice on breastfeeding including what breastfeeding helps to protect against, how to breastfeed and express milk, as well as how to recognise the signs that your baby is feeding well.

Karrie said, “We want to help and support mums who want to breastfeed their babies and it is important to remember any amount of breastfeeding has a positive effect. If a woman decides to breastfeed then her midwife and breastfeeding support worker, as well as health visitors, will do all they can to support her.”

Karrie continued: “Breastfeeding benefits your baby and the benefits last into childhood and beyond.

“It reduces the likelihood of various infections as breast milk contains antibodies linked to individuals – they are unique.

“Breastfed babies are less likely to get ill with stomach infections, chest infections and ear infections. They are less likely to suffer from allergies, including asthma and eczema.

“They are less likely to be overweight or obese or have type-2 diabetes in later life. Breastfed babies are more likely to have lower mean blood pressure in later life.”

For more information and advice on breastfeeding, visit the NHS Tayside Mums and Babies Facebook page at facebook.com/nhstaysidebabies